foam progression

Having built-up enough volume of foam over the month, I’m ready to start carving back, and get some shape happening. I can see this will take a while. It’s good though to feel the materials and have the pleasure of working them with hands-on and tools. This is, after all, the good part.

For a minute I’d optimistically thought I was half-way on this: that I’d move onto the larger final version sooner. But  now I want to take the time to enjoy working on this; what I’d been thinking of as the model, taking on an outcome of it’s own, and experimenting with form, contours, and especially surface details. Can I do both at once? Ooooh…?? I should work out the surface detail now, before I have to do it on the large final version. If I were smart about it. But I’m not. I’m careless , and frivolous, and it appears, unconcerned with technique and process.

bozzetto horse

Working this bozzetto for Horse Buddha using the common available materials as I have been doing lately, which I favor now because it can be much larger that the usual size of these; 48 in. vs 18 in., and I see it better, and is easier to build on and construct at this size, and I have a clean studio which feels enormous.DSCN3202

 

I love this word bozzetto.

unspoiled & undiluted

At the Washington National Gallery I saw two portraits, one by Franz Hals, the other, Rembrandt.

The subjects gaze with equanimity to the viewer, calm, composed, present, the presentation by artists unspoiled by having never seen a photograph. And as well, the subjects presenting the sense they have of themselves, undiluted by celebrity.

The world was young, every picture fresh. Old we all are now, surfeit of experience.

Horse Buddha

The horse decides one day that he is done being Mankind’s unit measure of power, his war horse, transport, and working his fields.

He thinks, “Have I not pulled enough wagons? Mankind doesn’t need me anymore, and I’m just a pet to him, like a cat or dog”.

So, He goes off to the river, finds a giant lotus flower to float upon, and, practicing austerities and Yoga, begins to cultivate his Buddha-Nature on his own.

The best start for any sculpture begins with a sketch on a coffee shop napkin. If you can get it down quickly, in the space of one cup of coffee, with a felt or ballpoint pen on fragile raggy paper, then you have a core idea which you can try to develop into something. Has to be this way: Reduce to the barest and worst  materials possible. That’s how you know you have a basic image worth continuing with.

The best start for any sculpture begins with a story… (lately this is happening to me)